a-kind-of-library:

bookishthingsblog:

How to Explain Amazon’s Kindle to Charles Dickens
As a student at Cardiff School of Art and Design, illustrator Rachel Walsh was asked to create a project that would explain something modern/internet-based to somebody who lived and died before 1900. 
Walsh’s innovative idea was to take a large book and create 40 miniature books from its pages in order to explain the kindle to Dickens. The covers are recreations from real books and include Dicken’s own novels, his favourite childhood books, and some of the artist’s own.
via

How cool!
a-kind-of-library:

bookishthingsblog:

How to Explain Amazon’s Kindle to Charles Dickens
As a student at Cardiff School of Art and Design, illustrator Rachel Walsh was asked to create a project that would explain something modern/internet-based to somebody who lived and died before 1900. 
Walsh’s innovative idea was to take a large book and create 40 miniature books from its pages in order to explain the kindle to Dickens. The covers are recreations from real books and include Dicken’s own novels, his favourite childhood books, and some of the artist’s own.
via

How cool!

a-kind-of-library:

bookishthingsblog:

How to Explain Amazon’s Kindle to Charles Dickens


As a student at Cardiff School of Art and Design, illustrator Rachel Walsh was asked to create a project that would explain something modern/internet-based to somebody who lived and died before 1900. 

Walsh’s innovative idea was to take a large book and create 40 miniature books from its pages in order to explain the kindle to Dickens. The covers are recreations from real books and include Dicken’s own novels, his favourite childhood books, and some of the artist’s own.

via

How cool!

iworkatapubliclibrary:

At the self-checkout desk.
iworkatapubliclibrary:

At the self-checkout desk.
iworkatapubliclibrary:

At the self-checkout desk.

iworkatapubliclibrary:

At the self-checkout desk.

durkin62:

We still haven’t even gotten past the 19th century yet around here. 

(Source: cartoonpolitics)

bunsen:

trying to make a situation better but ending up making it worse like

image

"One glance at [a book] and you hear the voice of another person - perhaps someone dead for thousands of years. Across the millennia, the author is speaking, clearly and silently, inside your head, directly to you. Writing is perhaps the greatest of human inventions, binding together people, citizens of distant epochs, who never knew one another. Books break the shackles of time, proof that humans can work magic."
— Carl Saga, Cosmos
generalelectric:

At GE Global Research, a tube of almost pure quartz is heated to temperatures of around 1,700 degrees Celsius to create custom laboratory glassware. The material is then molded and tailored specifically to the experiment it’s being created for.
generalelectric:

At GE Global Research, a tube of almost pure quartz is heated to temperatures of around 1,700 degrees Celsius to create custom laboratory glassware. The material is then molded and tailored specifically to the experiment it’s being created for.
generalelectric:

At GE Global Research, a tube of almost pure quartz is heated to temperatures of around 1,700 degrees Celsius to create custom laboratory glassware. The material is then molded and tailored specifically to the experiment it’s being created for.

generalelectric:

At GE Global Research, a tube of almost pure quartz is heated to temperatures of around 1,700 degrees Celsius to create custom laboratory glassware. The material is then molded and tailored specifically to the experiment it’s being created for.

"Not long ago, animated by the public mood about Congress and its current historic ineptitude and extremism, we decided to talk to members of Congress, from both houses and both parties, to find out what their problem was. And they started talking, often at length and in surprisingly thoughtful ways, about their jobs. I ended up talking to ninety members—a third of the Senate, more than a tenth of the House. They have all been eager to talk, as if they wanted to get something off their chest."

Humanizing and vaguely hopeful interactions with a dysfunctional legislature (also kinda meandering). Just in time for November.

labphoto:

3 different compound but same reaction conditions. Every flask contains 25 cm3 4M sodium hydroxide and a little alcohol for better solubilization. It should hydrolyze every ester what was in these these flasks.

Every reaction is under a sulfuric acid filled gas bubbler to see, that does the carboxylic acids decompose to CO2 or I’m lucky and they survive these conditions.

Swooooon glassware

  1. Camera: Nikon D5000
  2. Aperture: f/2.2
  3. Exposure: 1/40th
  4. Focal Length: 35mm

thecraftychemist:

Above: NUCLEAR POWER, NO WASTE Leslie Dewan of Transatomic, which is developing small reactors. Credit Mark Ostow for The New York Times 

Venture Capitalists Return to Backing Science Start-Ups

Vestaron makes an eco-friendly pesticide derived from spider venom. Bagaveev uses 3-D printers to make rocket engines for nanosatellites. Transatomic Power is developing a next-generation reactor that runs on nuclear waste.

They all have one thing in common: money from Silicon Valley venture capitalists.

After years of shying away from science, engineering and clean-technology start-ups, investors are beginning to take an interest in them again, raising hopes among entrepreneurs in those areas that a long slump is finally over. But these start-ups face intense pressure to prove that their science can turn a profit more quickly than hot tech companies like Snapchat and Uber.

In August, the Founders Fund, which has backed social networks like Facebook and Yammer and the streaming-music service Spotify, announced a $2 million investment in Transatomic Power of Cambridge, Mass.

Days earlier, Y Combinator, known for aiding web and mobile-app start-ups like the social news site Reddit and the game maker Omgpop, took part in a $1.5 million early investment in Helion Energy, which is developing an engine powered by nuclear fusion.

Read more

“The world needs a source of stable, cheap electricity, and a new approach to nuclear power would seem like an obvious solution,” said Leslie Dewan, a co-founder and the chief executive of Transatomic Power. “But it’s tricky getting $300 million from investors,” she said. “Maybe we need to build an iPhone app.”

It’s so weird being part of a ginormous technology corporation where I regularly hear talk about acquisitions and the cost benefit of investing/buying small tech start ups.

That guy with the microscope